From the Source: Georgia-Pacific Coos Bay Sawmill

From the Source: Georgia-Pacific Coos Bay Sawmill

This past month, a couple of Port staff took a tour of the Coos Bay, Georgia-Pacific (GP) sawmill to better understand and get to know one of our main shippers on the Coos Bay rail line. On an average day, GP ships approximately 12 rail cars on the Coos Bay Rail Link out of the facility. This is significant as each rail car has enough framing lumber to construct about six houses!

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From the Source: Long Fisheries

From the Source: Long Fisheries

After 8 years of being a commercial fisherman, Tyler expanded Long Fisheries operations through the lease of dock 15 along the Charleston working waterfront. With the addition of the dock, Long Fisheries provides a place for out of town buyers from LA to British Columbia, Canada to conduct business in Charleston.

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From the Source: North American Railcar Operators Association

From the Source: North American Railcar Operators Association

A couple weeks ago, the Oregon International Port of Coos Bay (OIPCB) and Coos Bay Rail Link (CBR) hosted the National American Railcar Operators Association (NARCOA) group on the Coos Bay rail line. NARCOA is a national non-profit organization that is “dedicated to the preservation and safe, legal operation of railroad equipment historically used for maintenance of way.”

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From the Source: Tarheel Aluminum

From the Source: Tarheel Aluminum

Tarheel Aluminum was started in 1989 by Tim Bohem in his garage on Tarheel Lane along Cape Arago Highway. Shortly after, the business grew and relocated to the Charleston Shipyard. In 2000, Ray Cox bought the business when his son, Kyle Cox, was in high school. It was during this time that Kyle learned a lot about the business and slowly over the years has taken the reigns to run Tarheel Aluminum. He became the official owner in July, 2016.

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From the Source: Fishermen's Wharf

From the Source: Fishermen's Wharf

Last year, the Port wrote a feature on Fishermen’s Wharf in our “From the Source” series. This year, we revisit this Charleston Marina icon again with its new owners, Will and Shanda Smith. The Smith’s look forward to carrying on the legacy of Fishermen’s Wharf by continuing to value the food, quality, fishermen, customers and the Charleston community.

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From the Source: Clausen Oysters

From the Source: Clausen Oysters

With more than 600 acres of tide lands, Clausen Oysters is the largest oyster farm in all of Oregon. Lilli and Max Clausen started the farm in the 1980s and in January of this year, sold it to four new owners from Southern California who she met through the Pacific Coast Shellfish Growers Association (PCSGA). Port staff met with two of the owners, Norm Abell and Rebecca Richards who run the day-to-day operations of the oyster farm.

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From the Source: Qualman Oyster Farms

Located out in Charleston, Qualman Oyster Farms was established in 1937 and at that time it was the only oyster farm in town. Its current owner, Larry Qualman, took over the business in 1962 and is an oyster farming veteran. Through the pictures (below), you get a sense of Larry’s fondness for oyster farming and the hard work that goes into it.

 Qualman Oysters over the years 

Qualman Oysters over the years 

For those who do not know, most oysters are not harvested from the wild (which I thought…clueless Willamette Valley girl right here!) Oysters are actually grown from seeds. These seeds are created from larvae oysters that attach to oyster shells. In the past, Qualman oysters used to buy their seeds from Miyage, Japan. However, now they are able produce their own.

When the seeds are ready, they are set on top of the stake, in a small groove attached by wires. The stakes are then planted up the South Slough where it takes about 24-30 months to grow the oyster. There is no particular “oyster season” as they can be grown all year round. Afterward, the oysters are harvested and brought back to the facility. There, his staff will separate and shuck them. Qualman oysters are unique in that they are all hand grown, handpicked and local. Since the oysters grow out in the South Slough sanctuary, they taste a bit different than oysters harvested from the bay. The water at the sanctuary is away from houses so the water is clean and pristine. Larry describes them as nice, sweet, and the best oysters out there.

 Breaking the Oysters apart 

Breaking the Oysters apart 

When asked about what he likes most about oyster farming, it’s very simple, he likes getting up early at low tide, heading up the slough, watching the birds and checking on the oysters. It’s a simple life but one that contributes to the economic backbone of Charleston.

From the Source: It's all About the Experience at Fishermen's Wharf

Matt (pictured above) opened up Fishermen’s Wharf in 2007 after buying it from the previous owner and his store has been one of the few local stores that provides fresh seafood right off the boat. Since a lot of seafood is usually trucked out of the local community, his store is a great outlet for local fishermen to sell their product and for people to get locally sourced seafood. In addition to fresh seafood, Fishermen’s Wharf also stocks specialty foods and snacks from places such as Italy, Spain, Portugal and more. The staff provides tours of the Charleston Marina and there’s a picnic area where people can enjoy the marina scene.

 Matt Ledeaux - Owner of Fishermen's Wharf 

Matt Ledeaux - Owner of Fishermen's Wharf 

 

What is most important to Matt though is not the seafood but the experience that customers get when they go to Fishermen’s wharf. It’s the experience of going down to the docks and picking out fresh seafood that came straight from the commercial fishing boats in the Charleston Marina. Some lucky customers might even get a visit from Charleston Marina’s own harbor seal, Flash.

Fishermen’s wharf also sees itself as an active part of contributing to the local community not only through its store but also through projects such as the America’s Best Communities grant. When asked about where he sees Fishermen’s Wharf in the future, he says “just right here.” Looks like tourists and the local community will have fresh and locally sourced seafood to look forward to for a long time.

 Located right on the docks! 

Located right on the docks! 

 

 

For more information or to order your own fresh seafood, go to http://fishermenswharforegon.com/

Matt also hosts the show “Fish Market Guys” on Fishermen’s Wharf’s Youtube Channel! For insight on the world of seafood and good laughs, go to http://bit.ly/1RTlfj4.

From the Source: Crabbing in Charleston

 Pictured from left to right: Burt, Sean, and Tyler 

Pictured from left to right: Burt, Sean, and Tyler 

The Charleston Crab Feed is coming up and we thought we'd give you an inside look on where the crabs on your plate this weekend come from! Yesterday, we got a glimpse on how crabs are processed and talked to three crabbers on what their lifestyle is like.


Pictured on the right is Tyler, the owner of The Harvester which he and his crew call the “Porsche” of crab boats. He’s been crabbing for 16 years and when asked about what it’s like, he says it’s a lot of getting up early and getting in late. He tells us the best spots for crabbing are usually at sandy spots, away from the rocks.


Burt (on the left) is also a crabber and went to high school with Tyler. They met at a wine festival in Elkton, reconnected and that’s when he got into crabbing. According to him “crabbing is where it’s at!” Burt likes crabbing because it’s pretty straightforward. “When you run 300 pots, it’s either good or bad. If it’s bad, you move somewhere else. There’s no indecisiveness to it.” It's the bread and butter of his family but during the off season, he is also involved in tuna, salmon and halibut fishing.

Crabbing however, does involve a lot of physical labor and hours without pay. For example, the gear takes about a month to get ready for the crabbing season. In addition, crabbing involves a lot of long hours. A good day to run 300 pots will be 12 hours if everything goes smoothly and that’s a good day.

A crabber at heart, Burt says that despite the long hours, crabbing is the best life and he wouldn’t trade it for any other job. In his words, “I love crabbing!”

Thank you to all the crabbers and fishermen out there who are a big part of our local economy! Don't forget to get crackin' this weekend at the Charleston Crab Feed!